History

Geordie’s War

Alan Richardson

Foreword by Sting

 

“This is the story of one man who served throughout the Great War, at the very front of the Fronts in the most brutal battles in history, and achieved that most astonishing feat of all – he survived. His name was George Matthew Richardson. He won the Military Medal and Bar and was nominated for the Distinguished Conduct Medal, yet was completely forgotten by his country, his clan, his hometown and – almost – his own family.”

 

Thus begins Geordie’s War, a new intertextual memoir from Alan Richardson, biographer of Dion Fortune and Aleister Crowley and author of On Winsley Hill and The Fat Git. Full of the wonderful wit and charm we’ve come to expect from this author, a lingering memory that starts with a grandfather’s watch commences a journey to the Western Front to offer what Richardson terms “A Plain Man’s Guide to the Great War.” A must for Geordies everywhere and for anyone whose family has been touched by the Great War, and with a foreword by Sting, Geordie’s War scintillates with over-the-top historical, cultural and regional resonances that will leave the reader longing for more.

 

The Book of Mélusine of Lusignan

in History, Legend & Romance

edited with translations by Gareth Knight

 

Considerable interest in faery tradition has grown up in recent years and not least in the story of Mélusine of Lusignan, the subject of a prose romance by Jean d’Arras at the end of the 14th century, swiftly followed by one in verse by Couldrette. This book provides a collection of material from various sources to give an all round picture of the remarkable faery, her town, her church, her immediate family, and the great Lusignan dynasty she founded.

 

An established authority on Mélusine, Gareth Knight collects together all the best source material, which he translates from the French, and presents his own researches into the Lusignan family of the 12th century, whose dynasty included kings of Cyprus and Jerusalem, examining the possibility of a familiar spirit guiding the family in its destiny.

 

 

The Groundlings of Divine Will

Daniel Staniforth

 

From the author of Weaver in the Sluices and Diddle comes this controversial, self-reflexive, ironic and humorous response to the way that Shakespeare is so often taught in contemporary academia.  The works of ‘Divine Will,’ as he is referred to throughout, have been confined to a vacuum, and almost biblically so in how the scripts have become wilfully detached from their moorings of time and place. In this hybridised long ‘Proem,’ Staniforth goes to absurd lengths of reattachment, gladly playing havoc with the swirling dictums and counter-dictums of his time, gleefully seeking to subvert the tautological authority of the neck-frilled academicians over the historical groundlings of the pit. Elements of satire, parody and burlesque are interposed as hagiographical substitutions made for the purposes of irony and deconstruction.  The reader will be initiated into the amalgamated and timeless world of the Groundlings to see how their invective gospel simply illustrates how discourse, rhetoric and that grandiloquent power of oration serves as the strongest definition for our collective place in history.

 

Staniforth is not afraid to dip into the cosmic trough and find magical pearls among the swine; the flashing twists and barbs of his heretic wit had me going up and down for hours.

— Rev. Obadiah Horseworthy

 

The tension between the divine will and human self-will is a subject that pervades the book; to that subject the profoundest insights into the hidden activity of providence and into human nature are brought.

— Emanuel Swedenborg

 

 

A History of White Magic

Gareth Knight

 

The world of magic is one of high imagination. In this wide-ranging historical survey Gareth Knight shows how the higher imagination has been used as an aid to the evolution of consciousness, from the ancient Mystery Religions, through Alchemy, Renaissance Magic, the Rosicrucian Manifestos, Freemasonry and 19th century Magical Fraternities, up to the modern era.

 

Knight considers magic as a middle ground between science and religion, reconciling them in a technology of the imagination, which properly used, can bring about personal regeneration and spiritual fulfilment. He uses Coleridge’s theory of the imagination as a basis for the validity of magic as science and art in its own right. Many systems and structures have come down through the ages slightly shoddy, misrepresented, maligned, misaligned. With this book a deconstruction becomes a recycling of raw material for the purposes of re-ordering and re-configuring – a righted prism, a shored up temple, a foundational re-ballasting.

 

“It is obvious from the beginning that we have here a work revealing the author’s spiritual maturity, a work with a definite message and structure, rather than the piecemeal gathering of snippets of information which often is offered in books with this sort of title, by inferior authors with little occult understanding.”

— The Hermetic Journal

 

 

The Tree of Visions

David Nez

 

The Tree of Visions is a historical overview of western esotericism, exploring its prehistoric and historical origins. It traces its beginnings in the shamanism of the paleolithic and neolithic ages, and follows its development in the sacred-magical traditions of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt and Greece to the present day. It is based on the thesis that primordial shamanic beliefs and practices involving visionary journeying, shapeshifting, use of spirit-helpers, asceticism, initiation ordeals, divination, astro-ceremonialism, use of magical rituals and paraphernalia, etc have remarkable parallels with the magical-religious practices of the ancient Mediterranean and European cultures. Written by visual artist, astrologer and ritual magician David Nez, the book presents the theory that shamanism forms the deepest stratum of human culture, myths and spiritual practices worldwide, accounting for the many similarities. Nez illustrates how these ancient beliefs and practices are still alive, albeit in new forms, in contemporary magic, neopaganism and neoshamanism, bolstering his thesis through excerpts from authorities in the fields of history, archaeology, ethnology, neuropsychology, psychology, comparative mythology and other fields.