Biography

Geordie’s War

Alan Richardson

Foreword by Sting

 

“This is the story of one man who served throughout the Great War, at the very front of the Fronts in the most brutal battles in history, and achieved that most astonishing feat of all – he survived. His name was George Matthew Richardson. He won the Military Medal and Bar and was nominated for the Distinguished Conduct Medal, yet was completely forgotten by his country, his clan, his hometown and – almost – his own family.”

 

Thus begins Geordie’s War, a new intertextual memoir from Alan Richardson, biographer of Dion Fortune and Aleister Crowley and author of On Winsley Hill and The Fat Git. Full of the wonderful wit and charm we’ve come to expect from this author, a lingering memory that starts with a grandfather’s watch commences a journey to the Western Front to offer what Richardson terms “A Plain Man’s Guide to the Great War.” A must for Geordies everywhere and for anyone whose family has been touched by the Great War, and with a foreword by Sting, Geordie’s War scintillates with over-the-top historical, cultural and regional resonances that will leave the reader longing for more.

 

The Little Book of the Great Enchantment

Steve Blamires

 

William Sharp (1855-1905) was a prolific writer; friend and confidant to the literati of the day; an active member of the occult world of the late Victorian period; and a man who spent his life cloaked in layers of secrets – the most important being that he was the pen behind the writings of the mysterious Fiona Macleod. He kept her true identity a closely guarded secret. Many famous people – W.B. Yeats, “AE”, MacGregor Mathers, Dante Gabriel Rossetti – were involved in Sharp’s short life; he was a member of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and Yeats’ secret Celtic Mystical Order; and he and Fiona Macleod were involved with the mysterious Dr. Goodchild whose ancient bowl was proclaimed by many to be the Holy Grail. But the enduring legacy of these two fascinating writers is the wealth of Faery magical lore contained in the writings of Fiona Macleod.

 

For the first time this book reveals previously unknown secrets from the life of William Sharp and shows clearly how to recover the Faery lore contained in Fiona Macleod’s literary output. These writings are not only about the Realm of Faery, they are the first authentic first-hand accounts from the Realm of Faery, revealing previously unknown Faery gods and goddesses, Faery belief, lore and magic.

 

The Little Book of the Great Enchantment adds significantly to the corpus of serious writings on this greatly misunderstood subject.

 

 

Stewart Farrar
Writer on a Broomstick

Elizabeth Guerra & Janet Farrar

 

Stewart Farrar was a World War II veteran, an accomplished script writer and a journalist who worked for many prominent and respected media companies such as Reuters and the newspaper Reveille. As a world traveller, Stewart had the opportunity to meet and work with many fascinating people and noted celebrities during his career. He was also a gifted photographer. In 1969, at the age of 53, he met Alex Sanders – the infamous “King of the Witches” – and his wife Maxine while interviewing the couple for Reveille. The encounter introduced him to a world of Witchcraft and magic and changed the course of his life. Farrar left his job as a journalist and devoted his life and career to writing about the Craft. The many books he authored on witchcraft, together with his wife, Janet Farrar, have become widely read and respected works on the topic.

 

Elizabeth Guerra and Janet Farrar have collaborated to record and explore Stewart Farrar’s life and career in detail. This book tracks Farrar’s development from an eager and talented adolescent to a college student and dedicated Communist to a gifted journalist and television, radio and film script writer and finally to his later life as a practitioner of Wicca and author of many non-fiction books and science fiction novels.

 

Stewart Farrar found Witchcraft by accident but devoted the rest of his life to the subject by educating others. He became one of the most prolific and much loved writers on the subject, and in doing so, helped to make Wicca a viable and accessible path for many.

 

 

I Called it Magic

Gareth Knight

 

“I called it magic – Kathleen Raine called it poetry – J. R. R. Tolkien called it enchantment – others have called it a variety of things – from mysticism to mumbo jumbo. All I know is that it works – and that for better or worse I have lived most of my life by it.”

 

The esoteric autobiography of Gareth Knight covers six decades of magical work, beginning with his induction into the Society of the Inner Light in the early 1950s, his resignation and founding of his own magical group, and subsequent return to the Society. It traces his series of legendary Hawkwood meetings working with Arthurian, Rosicrucian, Celtic and Greek archetypes, the powers of Merlin, the Tarot, the Qabalah, the Goddess and Tolkien’s elves. His journey takes in the Christian mystical tradition and the shining allure of Faery – all told through the warmth, wit, wisdom and humour of one who has never been afraid to plough his own furrow.

 

“If you have ever wanted to glean some understanding of the mind, and motivation, of an adept Mage-of-Light – this is THE book to read. It is the best account of its kind to be published in over a century.”

— Inner Fire Journal

 

 

 

 

I Called it Magic

Gareth Knight

 

Limited Edition Hardback

 

An edition of 150 plain grey clothbound hardback copies, individually numbered and signed.

 

Yours Very Truly Gareth Knight

Selected Letters 1969-2010

Gareth Knight

 

Written over a period of forty years and to over seventy different people, these letters include learned discourse with academics, exchanges of strange experiences with esoteric colleagues, and advice to seekers trying to find their path. The letters reveal extraordinary, entertaining and personal details of the life and work of a contemporary occultist.

 

“One fault of many occult students is to read too much … all too often the new student is so interested in reading the latest thing that he never gets round to actually doing any of it.”

 

“I suppose you can at least feel what it is like to be 'a lone voice crying in the wilderness' … I think even John the Baptist, in time, would have packed up his traps, said 'Sod it' (or 'Sod them') and gone home, maybe to start a locust and wild honey farm.”

 

“I am, I suppose, trying to pass myself off as a grand old man these days, after a long career as a slowly maturing and now possibly decaying enfant terrible.”

 

 

The Old Sod

The Odd Life and Inner Work

of William G. Gray

Alan Richardson & Marcus Claridge

 

“OK so I’m an old sod, an old bastard, a thousand different kinds of shit if you like, but I am a human being who loved the esoteric Tradition I tried to serve… Perhaps I didn’t do very well with what I’d got but I did my best…”

 

William G. Gray was a real magician, a kind of primeval spirit who worked his magic as an extension of the Life Force, not as a sop to ego. He reeked of psychism like he often reeked of incense, could give you the uncomfortable feeling that he could see right through you and beyond, and had been to places in spirit that we could scarcely imagine. Many of the books on magic and the Qabalah which appear today owe a huge if unrecognised debt to his pioneering writing. If there is anything evolutionary about the current urge to work with harmonic energies within the Earth and ourselves – whether through green eco-movements, the Celtic Revival or the Wiccan arts  – then it is due in no small degree to the work that was done by an old bastard who lived near the bus station in a town in Gloucestershire.

 

Bill Gray met and worked with many of the most important figures in the British esoteric scene. His boyhood meetings with Dion Fortune and Aleister Crowley are described here in his own words, along with his personal recollections of working magic with Pat Crowther, Doreen Valiente, Ronald Heaver, Robert Cochrane and many others. This lively, entertaining and authoritative biography tells the story of how a difficult, psychic child grew into a powerful adept who was equally at home in Hermetic and Craft traditions, and who challenged established assumptions within paganism and Qabalah alike and revitalised them from within – often falling out with those he worked with but maintaining their affection and respect. Generously illustrated with photographs, many never published before, the book also includes contributions by R.J. Stewart, Gareth Knight, Evan John Jones, Marcia Pickands and Jacobus Swart, plus, of course, W.G. Gray himself.