Arthurian & Grail

The Faery Gates of Avalon

Gareth Knight

 

The knights of King Arthur’s Round Table – Erec, Lancelot, Yvain, Perceval and Gawain – first appeared in the works of Chrétien de Troyes, who cast into Old French stories told by Welsh and Breton story tellers which had their origin in Celtic myth and legend. Chrétien wrote at a time when faery lore was still taken seriously – some leading families even claimed descent from faery ancestors! So we do well to look again at these early stories, for they were written not so much in terms of mystical quests or examples of military chivalry but records of initiation into Otherworld dynamics. Gareth Knight, an acknowledged expert on spiritual and magical traditions and a student of medieval French, goes to the well spring of Arthurian tradition to unveil these original principles. What is more, he shows how they can be regenerated today. “Opening the faery gates” can have its reward not only in terms of personal satisfaction and spiritual growth but as part of a much needed realignment of our spiritual responsibilities as human beings on planet Earth.

 

 

The Secret Tradition in Arthurian Legend

Gareth Knight

 

In this book Gareth Knight explores the archetypal themes, images and characters of the Arthurian cycle, particularly in relation to Le Morte D’Arthur, and their place in the Western magical tradition.

 

The Arthurian stories are the most famous and most haunting of all British legends, which draw their inspiration from Greek, Irish and even Atlantean myth. This book takes in turn the core grades of Arthur, Merlin, Guenevere and the Holy Grail to build a complete magical tradition. The central themes and characters are brought to life with clear and thorough explanations of their underlying symbolism, while the ancient pattern that is woven around the Arthuriad is carefully unravelled and its full esoteric significance revealed. This fascinating study takes the reader beyond the world of medieval literature and unfolds an inner landscape as real as the isles in which it was created.

 

 

Gwenevere and the Round Table

Wendy Berg

 

A follow up to her acclaimed Red Tree, White Tree, this book puts the faery elements of Arthurian legend into practice. It shows how the Round Table was an actual, practical system of magic, demonstrated by Gwenevere, who was its prime interpreter within the court of the Round Table. Central to the book is the concept of five Faery Kingdoms described in the legends, with which Gwenevere was closely associated: Lyonesse, Sorelois, Gorre and Oriande, about the central Grail kingdom of Listenois.

 

The book comprises a graded series of meditations, practical magical exercises, guided visualisations and a full ritual, which take the reader into each of the Faery kingdoms in turn, guided by Gwenevere, to experience the various challenges and gifts that they each represent. The fourth kingdom, Oriande, takes the reader into the Round Table of the Stars, an experiential journey through 12 constellations, which very neatly and remarkably demonstrates the continuing work of the Round Table into the future.

 

“A classic! Not only a lucid guide to faery dynamics in Arthurian and Grail legend but what to do about it, why, and how. A practical follow up to Wendy’s mind-blowing Red Tree, White Tree. Highly recommended.”

– Gareth Knight

 

 

Merlin and the Grail Tradition

Gareth Knight

 

Few figures from myth and legend have impressed the imagination like that of Merlin, Archmage of the land of Logres, whose shadowy, compelling presence plays a key part in the tales of Arthurian legend and the Quest of the Holy Grail.

 

In this lively collection of essays, Gareth Knight traces the historical importance and esoteric influence of Merlin and the Grail tradition from its mythological beginnings right down to modern times. Topics covered include Dion Fortune’s grail work at Glastonbury, the Merlin archetype, the “Elizabethan Merlin” John Dee, the blue stones of Preseli (which were used to build Stonehenge), and the connection between Merlin and Tolkien’s figure of Gandalf. This new edition of the book is expanded and has three additional articles, including an esoteric analysis of the legend of Sir Gareth which has never been published before.

 

 

Awen: the Quest of the Celtic Mysteries

Mike Harris

 

It was the Celtic bards who laid down the foundation of inner wisdom that has come down to us as Arthurian legend, passing their traditions to the Arthurian romancers of the 12th and 13th centuries. Thus the Celts provide an immediate bridge that leads to a very ancient world. Focusing on the Brythonic Celtic material and the “Taliesin” cult whose lineage preserved the mysteries through the Mabinogion and other texts, Awen: the Quest of the Celtic Mysteries reveals the sources of the British sacred tradition right back to the Neolithic and Bronze Ages, and, as some believe, further back still to even more ancient sources.

 

Awen is a Welsh word often translated as “inspiration”. However, in its fullness it has a much deeper meaning, an irradiation of the soul from paradisal origins. In the context of the Celtic folk-soul it casts the paradisal pattern by which the people and the land were harmonised. Through the aligned symbolism of the goddess, the sacred king and the stars, a compelling picture is built of a thriving mystery tradition which marries the constellations to the landscape, exploring as an example the interwoven five-fold and seven-fold stellar geometry of Moel ty Uchaf stone circle in North Wales, and the stellar alignments on the landscape of Cadair Idris.

 

Mike Harris is a well-established authority on the Welsh mystery traditions, having lived for many years in the area of Gwynedd where the Mabinogi and Taliesin myths arose, where he developed an acute sense of the Celtic and pre-Celtic mystery cults and their relationship with the landscape. He is the author of Merlin’s Chess, co-author of Polarity Magic, and founder of the Company of Avalon.

 

 

Red Tree, White Tree

Wendy Berg

 

The relationship between human and Faery lies at the very core of the Arthurian stories. In this radical re-evaluation of the Grail legends, Wendy Berg brings some meaningful light to the ancient mythology of the British Isles, centred around the marriage of King Arthur to the Faery Gwenevere. Drawing upon numerous Arthurian sources and other related texts, from the Book of Genesis to The Lord of the Rings, she explores the magical ritual underpinning of the legends and their connection to the ancient stellar deities of Britain. “When these stories are read with the additional level of understanding that they are for the most part a record of the lives and relationships of Faeries and humans working together about the Round Table, they immediately become not only a great deal more interesting, but also acquire a new and vivid relevance for the present day.”

 

Wendy Berg has thirty years’ experience of all aspects of the Western Mystery Tradition and is an authority on Egyptian, Celtic, Arthurian and Grail magical traditions. She blends a thorough knowledge and experience of the Qabalah and formal ritual magic with Christian Mysticism and modern Paganism. For many years she ran the Avalon Group, the magical fraternity founded by Gareth Knight.

 

“This is the most important and challenging book on Arthurian and Grail tradition for many a long year.”

– Gareth Knight

 

 

The Testament of Merlin

Théophile Briant
translated by Gareth Knight

 

This evocative esoteric novel follows the life and work of Merlin as the founder of the Round Table fellowship, his return of Excalibur to the Lake, his safe conduct of Arthur to Avalon, his liaison with Viviane and the Faery powers in the Forest of Broceliande, and the resuscitation of his disciple Adragante in the Cauldron of Keridwen – including a remarkable sequence of initiations for the young knight. For it is Adragante who is called to bear witness to Merlin’s life, his death at the hands of some shepherds at Drumelzier on the Scottish borders, and his subsequent apotheosis. Much of this is of great contemporary relevance in the present clash of Christian and Neo-Pagan dynamics.

 

Théophile Briant needs no introduction in France: from an old windmill and lighthouse in Brittany he published, between 1936 and his death in 1956, a remarkable journal (Le Goëland, or The Seagull) devoted to poetry, the arts and the esoteric. A great enthusiast of all things Breton and Celtic, he spent twelve years writing this powerfully esoteric novel, which was not published until nineteen years after his death and amazingly has not appeared in English until now. Gareth Knight, an established esoteric author in his own right, has translated a number of French esoteric books.

 

 

 

The Lost Book of the Grail

Restoring the Voices of the Wells

Being a new translation, by Gareth Knight, of the 13th century Elucidation of the Grail

 

with commentary by Caitlín Matthews and John Matthews

 

The Elucidation is a 13th century French poem that has lain virtually forgotten since its discovery in the mid19th century. It contains some of the most powerful and revealing clues to the nature of the Grail to be found in any of the many texts relating to this most mysterious of sacred objects.

 

This brief text purports to introduce us to Chrétien’s Perceval, le Conte du Graal, regarded as the first account of the Grail story, while actually providing a mythic prequel entirely different from Chrétien’s account. Within the seven branches of the story, we learn the cause of the Wasteland, of how the Maidens of the Wells were violated by the anti-Grail King, Amangons, and the attempt to restore the wells by the quests of King Arthur’s knights through the seven guardians of the story.

 

After tracing the history of the manuscript and its possible author, the commentators present to you the first full-length study of the Elucidation to appear in any language, in fulfilment of the text’s own words, ‘that the good that the Grail served will openly be taught to all people.’

 

Now, in a new translation by foremost esotericist, Gareth Knight, with a full-length commentary by Arthurian and Grail scholars, Caitlín & John Matthews, the treasury hidden within this ‘lost book’ of the Grail can finally be revealed.